The Birds of the Masters

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The Birds of the Masters

By Eric Myskowski, Assistant Reporter

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Anyone watching the Masters on TV would notice the birds singing in the background. Even though many, if not all of these sounds are artificially put in, the songs are still of birds that live in the region. Over two-thirds of the songs are from the Northern Cardinal. This is the same red cardinal many people know of, a denizen of thickets and shrubby backyards. It has a very musical song that is to many people one of the first signs of spring. It sings throughout the day, and unlike most birds, the female sings. The second most heard bird is the Carolina Wren, another common southern bird, one that also lives in thickets. It has a repetitive song that goes like”drink your tea.”  This bird also repeats its song throughout the day. Occasionally heard are the calls of the Northern Flicker, the song of the Chipping Sparrow and Pine Warbler and the calls of the Blue Jay. The Northern Flicker is a brown woodpecker known for a harsh call that it makes when threatened. Both the Pine Warbler and the Chipping Sparrow have trilling songs. These birds repeat notes at about the same pitch very quickly. The Blue Jay makes a very common call that literally goes like “jay, jay.”

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